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Must Read 438 Historical Fiction Books

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A Bend in the River

A Bend in the River is a 1979 novel by Nobel laureate V. S. Naipaul.
The novel, telling the story of Salim, a merchant in post-colonial mid-20th century Africa, is one of Naipaul’s best known works and was widely praised. It was shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1979. In 1998, the Modern...Read More

A Brief History of Seven Killings

A Brief History of Seven Killings is the third novel by Jamaican author Marlon James. It was published in 2014 by Riverhead Books. The novel spans several decades and explores the attempted assassination of Bob Marley in Jamaica in 1976 and its aftermath, through the crack wars in New York City in the 1980s and a changed Jamaica in the 1990s.

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A Christmas Carol

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A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas, commonly known as A Christmas Carol, is a novella by Charles Dickens, first published in London by Chapman & Hall in 1843 and illustrated by John Leech. A Christmas Carol recounts the story of Ebenezer Scrooge, an elderly miser who...Read More

A Death in the Family

A Death in the Family is an autobiographical novel by author James Agee, set in Knoxville, Tennessee. He began writing it in 1948, but it was not quite complete when he died in 1955 (with reputedly many portions having been written in the home of his friend Frances Wickes). It was edited and released...Read More

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A Farewell to Arms

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A Farewell to Arms

A Farewell to Arms is a novel by American writer Ernest Hemingway, set during the Italian campaign of World War I. First published in 1929, it is a first-person account of an American, Frederic Henry, serving as a lieutenant (“tenente”) in the ambulance corps of the Italian Army. The title...Read More

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A Fine Balance

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A Fine Balance

A Fine Balance is the second novel by Rohinton Mistry, published in 1995. Set in “an unidentified city” in India, initially in 1975 and later in 1984 during the turmoil of The Emergency, the book concerns four characters from varied backgrounds – Dina Dalal, Ishvar Darji, his nephew...Read More

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A Handful of Dust

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A Handful of Dust

A Handful of Dust is a novel by the British writer Evelyn Waugh. First published in 1934, it is often grouped with the author’s early, satirical comic novels for which he became famous in the pre-World War II years. Commentators have, however, drawn attention to its serious undertones, and have regarded it as a transitional work pointing towards Waugh’s Catholic postwar fiction.

A Prayer for Owen Meany

A Prayer for Owen Meany is the seventh novel by American writer John Irving. Published in 1989, it tells the story of John Wheelwright and his best friend Owen Meany growing up together in a small New Hampshire town during the 1950s and 1960s. According to John’s narration, Owen is a remarkable...Read More

9

A Room with a View

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A Room with a View

A Room with a View is a 1908 novel by English writer E. M. Forster, about a young woman in the restrained culture of Edwardian era England. Set in Italy and England, the story is both a romance and a humorous critique of English society at the beginning of the 20th century. Merchant Ivory produced an award-winning film adaptation in 1985.
The Modern Library ranked A Room with a View 79th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century (1998).

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A Separate Peace

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A Separate Peace

A Separate Peace is a coming-of-age novel by John Knowles, published in 1959. Based on his earlier short story “Phineas”, published in the May 1956 issue of Cosmopolitan, it was Knowles’s first published novel and became his best-known work. Set against the backdrop of World War II, A Separate Peace explores morality, patriotism, and loss of innocence through its narrator, Gene.

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A Suitable Boy

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A Suitable Boy

A Suitable Boy is a novel by Vikram Seth, published in 1993. With 1,349 pages (1,488 pages in paperback), the English–language book is one of the longest novels published in a single volume.A Suitable Boy is set in a newly post-independence, post-partition India. The novel follows four families...Read More

A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities is an 1859 historical novel by Charles Dickens, set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel tells the story of the French Doctor Manette, his 18-year-long imprisonment in the Bastille in Paris and his release to live in London with his daughter Lucie, whom he had never met. The story is set against the conditions that led up to the French Revolution and the Reign of Terror.

A Thousand Splendid Suns

A Thousand Splendid Suns is a 2007 novel by Afghan-American author Khaled Hosseini, following his bestselling 2003 debut The Kite Runner. Mariam, an illegitimate teenager from Herat, is forced to marry a shoemaker from Kabul after a family tragedy. Laila, born a generation later, lives a relatively privileged life, but her life intersects with Mariam’s when a similar tragedy forces her to accept a marriage proposal from Mariam’s husband.

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn is a 1943 semi-autobiographical novel written by Betty Smith. The story focuses on an impoverished but aspirational adolescent girl and her family living in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York City, during the first two decades of the 20th century.
The book was an immense...Read More

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Absalom, Absalom!

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Absalom, Absalom!

Absalom, Absalom! is a novel by the American author William Faulkner, first published in 1936. Taking place before, during, and after the American Civil War, it is a story about three families of the American South, with a focus on the life of Thomas Sutpen.

All the Pretty Horses

All the Pretty Horses is a novel by American author Cormac McCarthy published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1992. Its romanticism (in contrast to the bleakness of McCarthy’s earlier work) brought the writer much public attention. It was a bestseller, and it won both the U.S. National Book Award
and...Read More

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American Tabloid

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American Tabloid

American Tabloid is a 1995 novel by James Ellroy that chronicles the events surrounding three rogue American law enforcement officers from November 22, 1958, through November 22, 1963. Each becomes entangled in a web of interconnecting associations between the FBI, the CIA, and the mafia, which eventually...Read More

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Angle of Repose

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Angle of Repose

Angle of Repose is a 1971 novel by Wallace Stegner about a wheelchair-using historian, Lyman Ward, who has lost connection with his son and living family and decides to write about his frontier-era grandparents. It won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1972. The novel is directly based on the letters...Read More

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Anna Karenina

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Anna Karenina

Anna Karenina (Russian: «Анна Каренина», IPA: [ˈanːə kɐˈrʲenʲɪnə]) is a novel by the Russian author Leo Tolstoy, first published in book form in 1878. Many writers consider it the greatest work of literature ever written, and Tolstoy himself called it his first true novel. It...Read More

Anne of Green Gables

Anne of Green Gables is a 1908 novel by Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery (published as L.M. Montgomery). Written for all ages, it has been considered a classic children’s novel since the mid-twentieth century. Set in the late 19th century, the novel recounts the adventures of Anne Shirley,...Read More

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Arrowsmith

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Arrowsmith

Arrowsmith is a novel by American author Sinclair Lewis, first published in 1925. It won the 1926 Pulitzer Prize (which Lewis declined). Lewis was greatly assisted in its preparation by science writer Paul de Kruif, who received 25% of the royalties on sales, although Lewis was listed as the sole...Read More

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Asterix the Gaul

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Asterix the Gaul

Asterix the Gaul is the first volume of the Asterix comic strip series, by René Goscinny (stories) and Albert Uderzo (illustrations). In Le Monde’s 100 Books of the Century, a 1999 poll conducted by the French retailer Fnac and the Paris newspaper Le Monde, Asterix the Gaul was listed as the 23rd greatest book of the 20th century.

At Play in the Fields of the Lord

At Play in the Fields of the Lord is a 1965 novel by Peter Matthiessen. A film adapted from the book was released in 1991. A 2009 audiobook version was read by actor Anthony Heald.
“In a malarial outpost in the South American rain forest, two misplaced gringos converge and clash. Martin...Read More

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Atonement

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Atonement

Atonement is a 2001 British metafiction novel written by Ian McEwan. Set in three time periods, 1935 England, Second World War England and France, and present-day England, it covers an upper-class girl’s half-innocent mistake that ruins lives, her adulthood in the shadow of that mistake, and...Read More

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Austerlitz

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Austerlitz

Austerlitz is a 2001 novel by the German writer W. G. Sebald. It was Sebald’s final novel. The book received the National Book Critics Circle Award. In 2019, it was ranked 5th on The Guardian’s list of the 100 best books of the 21st century.

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Babbitt

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Babbitt

Babbitt (1922), by Sinclair Lewis, is a satirical novel about American culture and society that critiques the vacuity of middle class life and the social pressure toward conformity. The controversy provoked by Babbitt was influential in the decision to award the Nobel Prize in Literature to Lewis...Read More

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Ballet Shoes

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Ballet Shoes

Ballet Shoes: A Story of Three Children on the Stage is a children’s novel by Noel Streatfeild, published by Dent in 1936. It was her first book for children, and was illustrated by the author’s sister, Ruth Gervis. Diane Goode illustrated a 1991 edition published by Random House.Ballet...Read More

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress (French: Balzac et la petite tailleuse chinoise) is a semi-autobiographical novel written by Dai Sijie, and published in 2000 in French and in English in 2001. A film based on his novel directed by Dai was released in 2002.

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Bathsheba

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Bathsheba

This account of the Old Testament legend of Bathsheba tells the well-known stories of the rape of Tamar, the fall of Rabbah, the exile and rebellion of Absalom, and the death of King David.

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Before We Were Free

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Before We Were Free

Before We Were Free is a realistic book by Julia Alvarez. In this book, Anita de la Torre is a 12-year-old girl living in the Dominican Republic in 1960. Many of his relatives emigrated to the United States, Tío Toni disappeared, Papi received mysterious calls about butterflies and Mr. Smith. The secret police started terrorizing his family, claiming that they were against the country’s dictator.

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Beloved

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Beloved

Beloved is a 1987 novel by the American writer Toni Morrison. Set after the American Civil War, it tells the story of a family of former slaves whose Cincinnati home is haunted by a malevolent spirit. Beloved is inspired by a true-life incident involving Margaret Garner, an escaped slave from Kentucky...Read More

Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ

Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ is a novel by Lew Wallace, published by Harper and Brothers on November 12, 1880, and considered “the most influential Christian book of the nineteenth century”. It became a best-selling American novel, surpassing Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s...Read More

Berlin Alexanderplatz

Berlin Alexanderplatz (German: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn ʔalɛˈksandɐˌplats]) is a 1929 novel by Alfred Döblin. It is considered one of the most important and innovative works of the Weimar Republic. In a 2002 poll of 100 noted writers the book was named among the top 100 books of all time.

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Billy Budd

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Billy Budd

Billy Budd, Sailor is a novella by American writer Herman Melville left unfinished at Melville’s death in 1891. Acclaimed by critics as a masterpiece when a hastily transcribed version was finally published in 1924, it quickly took its place as a classic second only to Moby-Dick among Melville’s...Read More

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Birdsong

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Birdsong

Birdsong is a 1993 war novel and family saga by the English author Sebastian Faulks. It is Faulks’s fourth novel. The plot follows two main characters living at different times: the first is Stephen Wraysford, a British soldier on the front line in Amiens during the First World War, and the...Read More

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Black Beauty

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Black Beauty

Black Beauty: His Grooms and Companions, the Autobiography of a Horse is an 1877 novel by English author Anna Sewell. It was composed in the last years of her life, during which she remained in her house as an invalid. The novel became an immediate best-seller, with Sewell dying just five months after...Read More

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Bless Me, Ultima

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Bless Me, Ultima

Bless Me, Ultima is a coming-of-age novel by Rudolfo Anaya centering on Antonio Márez y Luna and his mentorship under his curandera and protector, Ultima. It has become the most widely read and critically acclaimed novel in the Chicano literary canon since its first publication in 1972. Teachers...Read More

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Bleak House

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Bleak House

Bleak House is a novel by Charles Dickens, first published as a 20-episode serial between March 1852 and September 1853. The novel has many characters and several sub-plots, and is told partly by the novel’s heroine, Esther Summerson, and partly by an omniscient narrator. At the centre of Bleak...Read More

39

Blood Meridian

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Blood Meridian

Blood Meridian or The Evening Redness in the West is a 1985 epic novel by American author Cormac McCarthy, classified under the Western, or sometimes the anti-Western, genre. McCarthy’s fifth book, it was published by Random House.
In a loosely historical context the narrative follows...Read More

Breath, Eyes, Memory

Breath, Eyes, Memory is Edwidge Danticat’s acclaimed 1994 novel, and was chosen as an Oprah Book Club Selection in May 1998. The novel deals with questions of racial, linguistic and gender identity in interconnected ways.

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Bring Up the Bodies

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Bring Up the Bodies

Bring Up the Bodies is a historical novel by Hilary Mantel; sequel to the award-winning Wolf Hall; and part of a trilogy charting the rise and fall of Thomas Cromwell, the powerful minister in the court of King Henry VIII. It won the 2012 Man Booker Prize and the 2012 Costa Book of the Year. The final novel in the trilogy, The Mirror and the Light, was published in March 2020.

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Bring Up the Bodies

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Bring Up the Bodies

Bring Up the Bodies is a historical novel by Hilary Mantel; sequel to the award-winning Wolf Hall; and part of a trilogy charting the rise and fall of Thomas Cromwell, the powerful minister in the court of King Henry VIII. It won the 2012 Man Booker Prize and the 2012 Costa Book of the Year. The final novel in the trilogy, The Mirror and the Light, was published in March 2020.

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Buddenbrooks

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Buddenbrooks

Buddenbrooks (German: [ˈbʊdn̩ˌbʁoːks] (listen)) is a 1901 novel by Thomas Mann, chronicling the decline of a wealthy north German merchant family over the course of four generations, incidentally portraying the manner of life and mores of the Hanseatic bourgeoisie in the years from 1835 to 1877....Read More

44

Call It Sleep

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Call It Sleep

Call It Sleep is a 1934 novel by Henry Roth. The book is about a young boy growing up in the Jewish immigrant ghetto of New York’s Lower East Side in the early 20th century.
Alhough it earned acclaim, the book sold poorly and was out of print for close to 30 years. It received a second...Read More

45

Cloud Atlas

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Cloud Atlas

Cloud Atlas is the third novel by British author David Mitchell. It was published in 2004. It won the British Book Awards Literary Fiction award and the Richard & Judy “Book of the Year” award. The year it was published, it was short-listed for the Booker Prize, Nebula Award for Best...Read More

46

Cloudstreet

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Cloudstreet

Cloudstreet is a novel by Australian writer Tim Winton published in 1991. It chronicles the lives of two working-class families, the Pickles and the Lambs, who come to live together in a large house called Cloudstreet in Perth over a period of twenty years, 1943 to 1963. The novel received several awards, including a Miles Franklin Award in 1992, and has been adapted into various forms, including a stage play and a television miniseries.

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Cold Sassy Tree

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Cold Sassy Tree

Cold Sassy Tree is a 1984 historical novel by Olive Ann Burns. Set in the US state of Georgia in the fictional town of Cold Sassy (based on the real city of Harmony Grove, now Commerce) in 1906, it follows the life of a 14-year-old boy named Will Tweedy, and explores themes such as religion, death, and social taboos. An incomplete sequel to the novel, Leaving Cold Sassy, was published in 1992 after Burns’ death.

Captain Corelli's Mandolin

Captain Corelli’s Mandolin, released simultaneously in the United States as Corelli’s Mandolin, is a 1994 novel by the British writer Louis de Bernières, set on the Greek island of Cephalonia during the Italian and German occupation of the Second World War.
The main characters are...Read More

49

Cousin Bette

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Cousin Bette

La Cousine Bette (French pronunciation: ​[la kuzin bɛt], Cousin Bette) is an 1846 novel by French author Honoré de Balzac. Set in mid-19th-century Paris, it tells the story of an unmarried middle-aged woman who plots the destruction of her extended family. Bette works with Valérie Marneffe, an...Read More

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Cranford

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Cranford

Cranford is an episodic novel by the English writer Elizabeth Gaskell. It first appeared in instalments in the magazine Household Words, then was published with minor revisions as a book with the title Cranford in 1853. The work slowly became popular and from the start of the 20th century it saw a number of dramatic treatments for the stage, the radio and TV.

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Cutting for Stone

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Cutting for Stone

Cutting for Stone (2009) is a novel written by Ethiopian-born Indian-American medical doctor and author Abraham Verghese. It is a saga of twin brothers, orphaned by their mother’s death at their births and forsaken by their father. The book includes both a deep description of medical procedures...Read More

52

Cyrano de Bergerac

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Cyrano de Bergerac

Cyrano de Bergerac is a play written in 1897 by Edmond Rostand. There was a real Cyrano de Bergerac, and the play is a fictionalisation following the broad outlines of his life.
The entire play is written in verse, in rhyming couplets of twelve syllables per line, very close to the classical...Read More

Les Liaisons dangereuses

Les Liaisons dangereuses (French: [le ljɛzɔ̃ dɑ̃ʒ(ə)ʁøz]; English: Dangerous Liaisons) is a French epistolary novel by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos, first published in four volumes by Durand Neveu from March 23, 1782.
It is the story of the Marquise de Merteuil and the Vicomte de Valmont,...Read More

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Days Without End

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Days Without End

Days Without End is the seventh novel by Sebastian Barry and is set during the Indian Wars and American Civil War. The novel is narrated by Thomas McNulty, an Irish émigré who flees to Canada and then America to escape the Great Famine. In America he befriends John Cole and the two fall in love, working first, as young boys, as cross-dressing entertainers and then enlisting in the army and taking part in both the Indian Wars and the American Civil War.

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Dead Souls

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Dead Souls

Dead Souls is a novel by Nikolai Gogol, first published in 1842, and widely regarded as an exemplar of 19th-century Russian literature. The novel chronicles the travels and adventures of Pavel Ivanovich Chichikov and the people whom he encounters. These people typify the Russian middle-class of the...Read More

Death Comes for the Archbishop

Death Comes for the Archbishop is a 1927 novel by American author Willa Cather. It concerns the attempts of a Catholic bishop and a priest to establish a diocese in New Mexico Territory.

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The Death of Virgil

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The Death of Virgil

The Death of Virgil (German: Der Tod des Vergil) is a 1945 novel by the Austrian author Hermann Broch. The narrative reenacts the last hours of life of the Roman poet Virgil, in the port of Brundisium (Brindisi), whence he had accompanied the emperor Augustus, his decision – frustrated by the emperor...Read More

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Dissolution

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Dissolution

Dissolution (2003) is a historical mystery novel by British author C. J. Sansom. It is Sansom’s first published novel, and the first in the Matthew Shardlake Series. It was dramatised by BBC Radio 4 in 2012.

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Doctor Faustus

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Doctor Faustus

Doctor Faustus is a German novel written by Thomas Mann, begun in 1943 and published in 1947 as Doktor Faustus: Das Leben des deutschen Tonsetzers Adrian Leverkühn, erzählt von einem Freunde (“Doctor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkühn, Told by a Friend”).

Dream of the Red Chamber

Dream of the Red Chamber, also called The Story of the Stone, or Hongloumeng, composed by Cao Xueqin, is one of China’s Four Great Classical Novels. It was written some time in the middle of the 18th century during the Qing dynasty. Long considered a masterpiece of Chinese literature, the novel...Read More

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Dreaming in Cuban

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Dreaming in Cuban

Dreaming in Cuban is the first novel written by author Cristina García, and was a finalist for the National Book Award. This novel moves between Cuba and the United States featuring three generations of a single family. The novel focuses particularly on the women—Celia del Pino, her daughters...Read More

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East of Eden

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East of Eden

East of Eden is a novel by American author and Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck. Published in September 1952, the work is regarded by many to be Steinbeck’s most ambitious novel and by Steinbeck himself to be his magnum opus. Steinbeck stated about East of Eden: “It has everything in...Read More

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Emily of New Moon

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Emily of New Moon

Emily of New Moon is the first in a series of novels by Lucy Maud Montgomery about an orphan girl growing up on Prince Edward Island. It is similar to the author’s Anne of Green Gables series.
It was first published in 1923.

Everything Is Illuminated

Everything Is Illuminated is the first novel by the American writer Jonathan Safran Foer, published in 2002. It was adapted into a film of the same name starring Elijah Wood and Eugene Hütz in 2005.
The book’s writing and structure received critical acclaim for the manner in which it...Read More

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Eye of the Needle

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Eye of the Needle

Eye of the Needle is a spy thriller novel written by Welsh author Ken Follett. It was originally published in 1978 by the Penguin Group under the title Storm Island. This novel was Follett’s first successful, best-selling effort as a novelist, and it earned him the 1979 Edgar Award for Best...Read More

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Fathers and Sons

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Fathers and Sons

Fathers and Sons (Russian: «Отцы и дети»; Otcy i deti, IPA: [ɐˈtsɨ i ˈdʲetʲi]; archaic spelling Отцы и дѣти), also translated more literally as Fathers and Children, is an 1862 novel by Ivan Turgenev, published in Moscow by Grachev & Co. It is one of the most acclaimed Russian novels of the 19th century.

For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls is a novel by Ernest Hemingway published in 1940. It tells the story of Robert Jordan, a young American volunteer attached to a Republican guerrilla unit during the Spanish Civil War. As a dynamiter, he is assigned to blow up a bridge during an attack on the city of Segovia.Read More

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Fugitive Pieces

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Fugitive Pieces

Fugitive Pieces is a novel by Canadian poet and novelist Anne Michaels. The story is divided into two sections. The first centers around Jakob Beer, a Polish Holocaust survivor while the second involves a man named Ben, the son of two Holocaust survivors. It was first published in Canada in 1996 and...Read More

69

Germinal

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Germinal

Germinal is the thirteenth novel in Émile Zola’s twenty-volume series Les Rougon-Macquart. Often considered Zola’s masterpiece and one of the most significant novels in the French tradition, the novel – an uncompromisingly harsh and realistic story of a coalminers’ strike in northern...Read More

Girl in Hyacinth Blue

Girl in Hyacinth Blue is a powerful historical novel by Professor Susan Vreeland. In which he invites a colleague from the art department to his house to see a painting kept secret for decades. The Professor swears it’s a Vermeer – but why has he kept it hidden for so long?

Go Tell It on the Mountain

Go Tell It on the Mountain is a 1953 semi-autobiographical novel by James Baldwin. It tells the story of John Grimes, an intelligent teenager in 1930s Harlem, and his relationship with his family and his church. The novel also reveals the back stories of John’s mother, his biological father,...Read More

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God's Bits of Wood

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God's Bits of Wood

God’s Bits of Wood is a 1960 novel by the Senegalese author Ousmane Sembène that concerns a railroad strike in colonial Senegal of the 1940s. It was written in French under the title Les bouts de bois de Dieu. The book deals with several ways that the Senegalese and Malians responded to colonialism....Read More

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Golden Child

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Golden Child

Golden Child is a 2019 novel by Claire Adam.
Set in rural Trinidad, it won the Desmond Elliott Prize and was selected on a 2019 BBC list of 100 ‘most inspiring’ novels.

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Gone with the Wind

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Gone with the Wind

Gone with the Wind is a novel by American writer Margaret Mitchell, first published in 1936. The story is set in Clayton County and Atlanta, both in Georgia, during the American Civil War and Reconstruction Era. It depicts the struggles of young Scarlett O’Hara, the spoiled daughter of a well-to-do...Read More

75

Goodbye to Berlin

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Goodbye to Berlin

Goodbye to Berlin is a 1939 novel by Anglo-American writer Christopher Isherwood set during the waning days of the Weimar Republic. The work has been cited by literary critics as deftly capturing the bleak nihilism of the Weimar period. It was adapted into the 1951 Broadway play I Am a Camera by John...Read More

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Gravity's Rainbow

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Gravity's Rainbow

Gravity’s Rainbow is a 1973 novel first published by Viking Press by the American writer Thomas Pynchon. The narrative is set primarily in Europe at the end of World War II and centers on the design, production and dispatch of V-2 rockets by the German military. In particular, it features the...Read More

Habibi (graphic novel)

Habibi is a black-and-white graphic novel by Craig Thompson published by Pantheon in September 2011. The 672-page book is set in a fictional Islamic fairy tale landscape and depicts the relationship between Dodola and Zam, two escaped child slaves, who are torn apart and undergo many transformations...Read More

Half of a Yellow Sun

Half of a Yellow Sun is a novel by Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Published in 2006 by Fourth Estate, the novel tells the story of the Biafran War through the perspective of the characters Olanna, Ugwu, and Richard.

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Hawaii (novel)

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Hawaii (novel)

Hawaii is a novel by James Michener published in 1959, the year that Hawaii became the 50th U.S. state. It has been translated into 32 languages.The historical correctness of the novel is high, although the narrative about the early Polynesian inhabitants is based more on folklore than anthropological...Read More

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Heart of Darkness

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Heart of Darkness

Heart of Darkness (1899) is a novella by Polish-English novelist Joseph Conrad about a narrated voyage up the Congo River into the Congo Free State in the Heart of Africa. Charles Marlow, the narrator, tells his story to friends aboard a boat anchored on the River Thames. This setting provides the...Read More

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Heat and Dust

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Heat and Dust

Heat and Dust (1975) is a novel by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala which won the Booker Prize in 1975. The book was also ranked by The Telegraph in 2014 as one of the 10 all-time greatest Asian novels.

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Heidi

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Heidi

Heidi (; German: [ˈhaɪdi]) is a work of children’s fiction published in 1881 by Swiss author Johanna Spyri, originally published in two parts as Heidi: Her Years of Wandering and Learning (German: Heidis Lehr- und Wanderjahre) and Heidi: How She Used What She Learned (German: Heidi kann brauchen,...Read More

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The People of Hemso

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The People of Hemso

The People of Hemsö (Swedish: Hemsöborna) is an 1887 novel by August Strindberg about the life of people of the island Hemsö in the Stockholm archipelago. Hemsö is a fictional island, but it is based on Kymmendö where Strindberg had spent time in his youth. Strindberg wrote the book to combat...Read More

84

The People of Hemso

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The People of Hemso

The People of Hemsö (Swedish: Hemsöborna) is an 1887 novel by August Strindberg about the life of people of the island Hemsö in the Stockholm archipelago. Hemsö is a fictional island, but it is based on Kymmendö where Strindberg had spent time in his youth. Strindberg wrote the book to combat...Read More

The Home and the World

The Home and the World (in the original Bengali, ঘরে বাইরে Ghôre Baire or Ghare Baire, lit. “At home and outside”) is a 1916 novel by Rabindranath Tagore. The book illustrates the battle Tagore had with himself, between the ideas of Western culture and revolution against...Read More

Homegoing (Gyasi novel)

Homegoing is the debut historical fiction novel by Ghanaian-American author Yaa Gyasi, published in 2016. Each chapter in the novel follows a different descendant of an Asante woman named Maame, starting with her two daughters, who are half-sisters, separated by circumstance: Effia marries James Collins,...Read More

87

Horseman, Pass By

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Horseman, Pass By

Horseman, Pass By is a Western novel by American writer Larry McMurtry. His first novel, it was
published when he was 25. This 1961 Western portrays life on a cattle ranch from the perspective of young narrator Lonnie Bannon. Set in post-World War II Texas (1954), the Bannon ranch is owned...Read More

88

House Made of Dawn

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House Made of Dawn

House Made of Dawn is a 1968 novel by N. Scott Momaday, widely credited as leading the way for the breakthrough of Native American literature into the mainstream. It was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1969, and has also been noted for its significance in Native American anthropology.

House with the Blind Glass Windows

This novel chronicles a year in the life of 11-year-old Tora. She consoles herself with lonely fantasies about her real father, with books, and with the friendship and support of a few village women. This proletarian feminist novel is about the oppression of women. Awarded a coveted Nordic Award, it is the first volume of a trilogy.

90

Howards End

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Howards End

Howards End is a novel by E. M. Forster, first published in 1910, about social conventions, codes of conduct and relationships in turn-of-the-century England. Howards End is considered by many to be Forster’s masterpiece. The book was conceived in June 1908 and worked on throughout the following year; it was completed in July 1910.

I Capture the Castle

I Capture the Castle is the first novel by the English author Dodie Smith, written during the Second World War when she and her husband Alec Beesley (also English and a conscientious objector) had relocated to California. She longed for home and wrote of a happier time, unspecified in the novel apart...Read More

92

I, Claudius

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I, Claudius

I, Claudius is a historical novel by English writer Robert Graves, published in 1934. Written in the form of an autobiography of the Roman Emperor Claudius, it tells the history of the Julio-Claudian dynasty and the early years of the Roman Empire, from Julius Caesar’s assassination in 44 BC...Read More

93

Ice-Candy-Man

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Ice-Candy-Man

Cracking India, (1991, U.S., 1992, India; originally published as Ice Candy Man, 1988, England) is a novel by author Bapsi Sidhwa.

If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem

If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem is a novel by the American author William Faulkner published in 1939. The novel was originally published under the title The Wild Palms, which is the title of one of the two interwoven stories. This title was chosen by the publishers, Random House, over the objections of...Read More

In the Castle of My Skin

In the Castle of My Skin is the first and much acclaimed novel by Barbadian writer George Lamming, originally published in 1953 by Michael Joseph in London, and subsequently published in New York City by McGraw-Hill. The novel won a Somerset Maugham Award and was championed by eminent figures Jean-Paul...Read More

In the Time of the Butterflies

In the Time of the Butterflies is a historical fiction novel by Julia Alvarez, relating a fictionalized account of the Mirabal sisters during the time of the Trujillo dictatorship in the Dominican Republic. The book is written in the first and third person, by and about the Mirabal sisters. First published in 1994, the story was adapted into a feature film in 2001.

97

Independent People

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Independent People

Independent People (Icelandic: Sjálfstætt fólk) is an epic novel by Nobel laureate Halldór Laxness, originally published in two volumes in 1934 and 1935; literally the title means “Self-standing [i.e. self-reliant] folk”. It deals with the struggle of poor Icelandic farmers in the...Read More

Interview with the Vampire

Interview with the Vampire is a gothic horror and vampire novel by American author Anne Rice, published in 1976. It was her debut novel. Based on a short story Rice wrote around 1968, the novel centers on vampire Louis de Pointe du Lac, who tells the story of his life to a reporter. Rice composed...Read More

99

It (novel)

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It (novel)

It is a 1986 horror novel by American author Stephen King. It was his 22nd book and his 17th novel written under his own name. The story follows the experiences of seven children as they are terrorized by an evil entity that exploits the fears of its victims to disguise itself while hunting its prey. “It” primarily appears in the form of Pennywise the Dancing Clown to attract its preferred prey of young children.

100

Ivanhoe

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Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe: A Romance by Walter Scott is a historical novel published in three volumes, in 1819, as one of the Waverley novels. At the time it was written, the novel represented a shift by Scott away from writing novels set in Scotland in the fairly recent past to a more fanciful depiction of England in the Middle Ages. Ivanhoe proved to be one of the best-known and most influential of Scott’s novels.

101

Jude the Obscure

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Jude the Obscure

Jude the Obscure is a novel by Thomas Hardy, which began as a magazine serial in December 1894 and was first published in book form in 1896. It is Hardy’s last completed novel. The protagonist, Jude Fawley, is a working-class young man; he is a stonemason who dreams of becoming a scholar. The other main character is his cousin, Sue Bridehead, who is also his central love interest. The novel is concerned in particular with issues of class, education, religion, morality and marriage.

102

Kaputt

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Kaputt

Kaputt is a book written by Curzio Malaparte between 1941 and 1943 . It is difficult to call it a novel in the common sense of the term: it does not have a predictable plot development. It is rather a set of episodes, partly autobiographical , held together by the reference to the war frame in which the story unfolds.

103

Kidnapped

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Kidnapped

Kidnapped is a historical fiction adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, written as a boys’ novel and first published in the magazine Young Folks from May to July 1886. The novel has attracted the praise and admiration of writers as diverse as Henry James, Jorge Luis Borges,...Read More

104

Kristin Lavransdatter

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Kristin Lavransdatter

Kristin Lavransdatter is a trilogy of historical novels written by Nobel laureate Sigrid Undset. The individual novels are Kransen (The Wreath), first published in 1920, Husfrue (The Wife), published in 1921, and Korset (The Cross), published in 1922. Kransen and Husfrue were translated from the original...Read More

Lady Chatterley's Lover

Lady Chatterley’s Lover is a novel by English author D. H. Lawrence that was first published privately in 1928 in Italy and in 1929 in France. An unexpurgated edition was not published openly in the United Kingdom until 1960, when it was the subject of a watershed obscenity trial against the publisher Penguin Books, which won the case and quickly sold three million copies. The book was also banned for obscenity in the United States, Canada, Australia, India and Japan.

Lark Rise to Candleford

Lark Rise to Candleford is a trilogy of semi-autobiographical novels by Flora Thompson (1876 – 1947) about the countryside of north-east Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, England, at the end of the 19th century. The stories were previously published separately as Lark Rise in 1939, Over to Candleford in 1941 and Candleford Green in 1943. They were first published together in 1945.

107

Le Morte d'Arthur

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Le Morte d'Arthur

Le Morte d’Arthur (originally spelled Le Morte Darthur, ungrammatical Middle French for “The Death of Arthur”) is a 15th-century Middle English prose reworking by Sir Thomas Malory of tales about the legendary King Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot, Merlin and the Knights of the Round...Read More

108

Les Misérables

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Les Misérables

Les Misérables (, French: [le mizeʁabl(ə)]) is a French historical novel by Victor Hugo, first published in 1862, that is considered one of the greatest novels of the 19th century.
In the English-speaking world, the novel is usually referred to by its original French title. However, several...Read More

Let the Great World Spin

Let the Great World Spin is a novel by Colum McCann set mainly in New York City in the United States. The book won the 2009 U.S. National Book Award for Fiction and the 2011 International Dublin Literary Award, one of the most lucrative literary prizes in the world. Its title comes from the poem “Locksley Hall” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson.

Like Water for Chocolate

Like Water for Chocolate (Spanish: Como agua para chocolate) is a novel by Mexican novelist and screenwriter Laura Esquivel.The novel follows the story of a young girl named Tita, who longs for her lover, Pedro, but can never have him because of her mother’s upholding of the family tradition:...Read More

111

Lincoln in the Bardo

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Lincoln in the Bardo

Lincoln in the Bardo is a 2017 experimental novel by American writer George Saunders. It is Saunders’s first full-length novel and was the New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller for the week of March 5, 2017. Saunders is better known for his short stories, reporting and occasional essays.The...Read More

112

Lonesome Dove

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लोनसम डोव 11

Lonesome Dove is a 1985 Western novel by American writer Larry McMurtry. It is the first published book of the Lonesome Dove series but the third installment in the series chronologically.
The story focuses on the relationship among several retired Texas Rangers and their adventures driving...Read More

113

Lord Jim

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लॉर्ड जिम 12

Lord Jim is a novel by Joseph Conrad originally published as a serial in Blackwood’s Magazine from October 1899 to November 1900. An early and primary event in the story is the abandonment of a passenger ship in distress by its crew, including a young British seaman named Jim. He is publicly...Read More

लव इन ए कोल्ड क्लाइमेट 13

Love in a Cold Climate is a novel by Nancy Mitford, first published in 1949. The title is a phrase from George Orwell’s novel Keep the Aspidistra Flying (1936).
Love in a Cold Climate is a companion volume to The Pursuit of Love. The time frame of Love in a Cold Climate is the same as...Read More

115

Love Medicine

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लव मेडिसिन 14

Love Medicine is Louise Erdrich’s debut novel, first published in 1984. Erdrich revised and expanded the novel in subsequent 1993 and 2009 editions. The book follows the lives of five interconnected Ojibwe families living on fictional reservations in Minnesota and North Dakota. The collection of stories in the book spans six decades from the 1930s to the 1980s. Love Medicine garnered critical praise and won numerous awards, including the 1984 National Book Critics Circle Award.

116

Loving (novel)

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लविंग 15

Loving is a 1945 novel by British writer Henry Green. Time included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005. One of his most admired works, Loving describes life above and below stairs in an Irish country house during the Second World War. In the absence of their employers...Read More

117

Lust for Life

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लस्ट फॉर लाइफ 16

Lust for Life (1934) is a biographical novel written by Irving Stone about the life of the famous Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh and his hardships. It was Stone’s first major publication, and is largely based on the collection of letters between Vincent van Gogh and his younger brother, art...Read More

118

Main Street (novel)

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मेन स्ट्रीट 17

Main Street is a satirical novel written by Sinclair Lewis, and published in 1920.
Satirizing small town life, Main Street is perhaps Sinclair Lewis’s most famous book, and led in part to his eventual 1930 Nobel Prize for Literature. It relates the life and struggles of Carol Milford Kennicott...Read More

119

Martin Eden

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मार्टिन ईडन 18

Martin Eden is a 1909 novel by American author Jack London about a young proletarian autodidact struggling to become a writer. It was first serialized in The Pacific Monthly magazine from September 1908 to September 1909 and then published in book form by Macmillan in September 1909.
Eden represents...Read More

120

Mason & Dixon

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मेसन एंड डिक्सन 19

Mason & Dixon is a postmodernist novel by U.S. author Thomas Pynchon published in 1997. It presents a fictionalized account of the collaboration between Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in their astronomical and surveying exploits in the Dutch Cape Colony, Saint Helena, Great Britain and along the Mason-Dixon line in British North America on the eve of the Revolutionary War in the United States.

मेमोइर्स ऑफ़ ए फॉक्स-हंटिंग मैन 20

Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man is a novel by Siegfried Sassoon, first published in 1928 by Faber and Faber. It won both the Hawthornden Prize and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, being immediately recognised as a classic of English literature. In the years since its first appearance, it has regularly been a set text for British schoolchildren.

122

Memoirs of a Geisha

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मेमोइर्स ऑफ़ ए गीशा 22

Memoirs of a Geisha is a historical fiction novel by American author Arthur Golden, published in 1997. The novel, told in first person perspective, tells the story of a fictional geisha working in Kyoto, Japan, before, during and after World War II, and ends with her being relocated to New York City.
In 2005, a film version was released.

123

Memoirs of Hadrian

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मेमोइर्स ऑफ़ हैड्रियन 23

Memoirs of Hadrian is a novel by the Belgian-born French writer Marguerite Yourcenar about the life and death of Roman Emperor Hadrian. First published in France in French in 1951 as Mémoires d’Hadrien, the book was an immediate success, meeting with enormous critical acclaim. Although the...Read More

124

Middlemarch

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मिडिलमार्च 24

Middlemarch, A Study of Provincial Life is a novel by the English author Mary Anne Evans, who wrote as George Eliot. It first appeared in eight instalments (volumes) in 1871 and 1872. Set in Middlemarch, a fictional English Midland town, in 1829 to 1832, it follows distinct, intersecting stories with...Read More

125

Middlesex (novel)

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मिडिलसेक्स 25

Middlesex is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Jeffrey Eugenides published in 2002. The book is a bestseller, with more than four million copies sold since its publication. Its characters and events are loosely based on aspects of Eugenides’ life and observations of his Greek heritage. It is...Read More

126

Midnight's Children

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मिडनाइट्स चिल्ड्रेन 26

Midnight’s Children is a 1981 novel by author Salman Rushdie. It portrays India’s transition from British colonial rule to independence and the partition of India. It is considered an example of postcolonial, postmodern, and magical realist literature. The story is told by its chief protagonist, Saleem Sinai, and is set in the context of actual historical events. The style of preserving history with fictional accounts is self-reflexive.

127

Milkman (novel)

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मिल्कमैन 27

Milkman is a historical psychological fiction novel written by the Irish author Anna Burns. Set during The Troubles in Northern Ireland, the story follows an 18-year-old girl who is harassed by an older married man known as the “milkman”. It is Burns’s first novel to be published...Read More

128

Moby-Dick

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मोबी-डिक 28

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is an 1851 novel by American writer Herman Melville. The book is the sailor Ishmael’s narrative of the obsessive quest of Ahab, captain of the whaling ship Pequod, for revenge on Moby Dick, the giant white sperm whale that on the ship’s previous voyage bit off...Read More

129

The Color Purple

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The Color Purple

The Color Purple is a 1982 epistolary novel by American author Alice Walker which won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction. It was later adapted into a film and musical of the same name. The novel has been the frequent target of censors and appears on the American Library Association list of the 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2000–2009 at number seventeen because of the sometimes explicit content, particularly in terms of violence.

130

The Da Vinci Code

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द डा विंची कोड 29

The Da Vinci Code is a 2006 American mystery thriller film directed by Ron Howard, written by Akiva Goldsman, and based on Dan Brown’s 2003 best-selling novel of the same name. The first in the Robert Langdon film series, the film stars Tom Hanks, Audrey Tautou, Sir Ian McKellen, Alfred Molina, Jürgen Prochnow, Jean Reno and Paul Bettany

131

The Secret Garden

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The Secret Garden

The Secret Garden is a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett first published in book form in 1911, after serialisation in The American Magazine (November 1910 – August 1911). Set in England, it is one of Burnett’s most popular novels and seen as a classic of English children’s literature. Several stage and film adaptations have been made. The American edition was published by the Frederick A.

132

A Christmas Carol

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A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas, commonly known as A Christmas Carol, is a novella by Charles Dickens, first published in London by Chapman & Hall in 1843 and illustrated by John Leech. A Christmas Carol recounts the story of Ebenezer Scrooge, an elderly miser who is visited by the ghost of his former business partner Jacob Marley and the spirits of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come.

A Dance to The Music of Time

A Dance to the Music of Time is a 12-volume roman-fleuve by Anthony Powell, published between 1951 and 1975 to critical acclaim. The story is an often comic examination of movements and manners, power and passivity in English political, cultural and military life in the mid-20th century. The books were inspired by the painting of the same name by Nicolas Poussin.

134

A Rising Man

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A Rising Man

Captain Sam Wyndham, former Scotland Yard detective, is a new arrival to Calcutta. Desperately seeking a fresh start after his experiences during the Great War, Wyndham has been recruited to head up a new post in the police force.

135

A Thousand Ships

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A Thousand Ships

A Thousand Ships is a 2019 novel by Natalie Haynes which retells the mythology of the Trojan war from the perspective of the women involved.  As a framing device, the muse Calliope narrates several stories from Greek mythology to an unidentified male poet.

136

Alex And Eliza

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Alex And Eliza

As battle cries of the American Revolution echo in the distance, servants flutter about preparing for one of New York society’s biggest events: the Schuylers’ grand ball.

Love & War: An Alex & Eliza Story

As the war for American Independence carries on, two newlyweds are settling into their new adventure: marriage. But the honeymoon’s over, and Alexander Hamilton and Eliza Schuyler are learning firsthand just how tricky wedded life can be.

138

Alias Grace

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Alias Grace

Alias Grace is a novel of historical fiction by Canadian writer Margaret Atwood. First published in 1996 by McClelland & Stewart, it won the Canadian Giller Prize and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. The story fictionalizes the notorious 1843 murders of Thomas Kinnear and his housekeeper Nancy Montgomery in Canada West.

All The Light We Cannot See

All the Light We Cannot See is a war novel written by American author Anthony Doerr, published by Scribner on May 6, 2014. It won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the 2015 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. Set in occupied France during World War II, the novel centers on a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths eventually cross.

140

And I Darken

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And I Darken

Ever since she and her gentle younger brother, Radu, were wrenched from their homeland of Wallachia and abandoned by their father to be raised in the Ottoman courts, Lada has known that being ruthless is the key to survival.

141

Arthur & George

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Arthur & George

Arthur & George (2005) is the tenth novel by English author Julian Barnes which takes as its basis the true story of the “Great Wyrley Outrages”. Set at the turn of the 20th century, the story follows the separate but intersecting lives of two very different British men: a half-Indian solicitor and son of a Vicar, George Edalji, and the world-famous author of the Sherlock Holmes stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

142

As Meat Loves Salt

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As Meat Loves Salt

As Meat Loves Salt is a gripping portrait of England beset by war. It is also a moving portrait of a man on the brink of madness. Hailed as a masterpiece, this is a novel by a most original new voice in fiction.

143

August 1914

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August 1914

August 1914  is a Russian novel by Nobel Prize-winning writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn about the defeat of the Imperial Russian Army at the Battle of Tannenberg in East Prussia. The novel was completed in 1970, first published in 1971, with an English translation the following year.

144

Aurélien

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Aurélien

Aurélien is a novel by Louis Aragon, the fourth of the Le Monde réel cycle. It was ranked 51st in Le Monde’s 100 Books of the Century.  Aurélien (1978), TV film directed by Michel Favart, screenplay adapted by Michel Favart and Françoise Verny, starring Philippe Nahoun as Aurélien and Françoise Lebrun as Bérénice.

Ballad of the Salt Sea

The Ballad of the Salty Sea is a graphic novel, the first episode of the adventures of Corto Maltese, a Maltese sailor. This story was written and drawn by the Italian comic book creator Hugo Pratt. It was published for the first time between 1967 and 1969, in the magazine Sergente Kirk.

146

Barchester Towers

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Barchester Towers

Barchester Towers is a novel by English author Anthony Trollope published by Longmans in 1857. It is the second book in the Chronicles of Barsetshire series, preceded by The Warden and followed by Doctor Thorne. Among other things it satirises the antipathy in the Church of England between High Church and Evangelical adherents.

147

Burial Rites

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Burial Rites

Burial Rites tells the story of Agnes Magnúsdóttir, a servant in northern Iceland who was condemned to death after the murder of two men, one of whom was her employer, and became the last woman put to death in Iceland.

148

Caleb's Crossing

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Caleb's Crossing

The narrator of Caleb’s Crossing is Bethia Mayfield, growing up in the tiny settlement of Great Harbor amid a small band of pioneers and Puritans. Restless and curious, she yearns after an education that is closed to her by her sex.

149

Circus Of Wonders

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Circus Of Wonders

1866. In a coastal village in southern England, Nell picks violets for a living. Set apart by her community because of the birthmarks that speckle her skin, Nell’s world is her beloved brother and devotion to the sea.

150

City Of Vengeance

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City Of Vengeance

A prominent Jewish moneylender is murdered in his home, a death with wide implications in a city powered by immense wealth. Cesare Aldo, a former soldier and now an officer of the Renaissance city’s most feared criminal court, is given four days to solve the murder: catch the killer before the feast of Epiphany – or suffer the consequences.

151

City Of Women

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City Of Women

It is 1943 – the height of the Second World War – and Berlin has essentially become a city of women. In this page-turning novel, David Gillham explores what happens to ordinary people thrust into extraordinary times, and how the choices they make can be the difference between life and death.

152

Cloudsplitter

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Cloudsplitter

Cloudsplitter is a 1998 historical novel by Russell Banks relating the story of abolitionist John Brown. The novel is narrated as a retrospective by John Brown’s son, Owen Brown, from his hermitage in the San Gabriel Mountains of California.

153

Cold Mountain

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Cold Mountain

Cold Mountain is a 1997 historical novel by Charles Frazier which won the U.S. National Book Award for Fiction. It tells the story of W. P. Inman, a wounded deserter from the Confederate army near the end of the American Civil War who walks for months to return to Ada Monroe, the love of his life; the story shares several similarities with Homer’s Odyssey.

154

Kololo Hill

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Kololo Hill

A devastating decree is issued: all Ugandan Asians must leave the country in ninety days. They must take only what they can carry, give up their money and never return.

155

The Sun Also Rises

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The Sun Also Rises

The Sun Also Rises is a 1926 novel by American writer Ernest Hemingway, his first, that portrays American and British expatriates who travel from Paris to the Festival of San Fermín in Pamplona to watch the running of the bulls and the bullfights. An early and enduring modernist novel, it received mixed reviews upon publication.

156

The Sympathizer

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The Sympathizer

The Sympathizer is the 2015 debut novel by Vietnamese American professor Viet Thanh Nguyen. It is a best-selling novel and recipient of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Its reviews have generally recognized its excellence, and it was named a New York Times Editor’s Choice.

157

The Tea Rose

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The Tea Rose

The Tea Rose is a historical fiction novel by Jennifer Donnelly. It is the first book of a trilogy about London’s East End at the turn of the 19th century. It was first published October 1, 2002 by Thomas Dunne Books, an imprint of St. Martin’s Press.

The Things They Carried

The Things They Carried (1990) is a collection of linked short stories by American novelist Tim O’Brien, about a platoon of American soldiers fighting on the ground in the Vietnam War. His third book about the war, it is based upon his experiences as a soldier in the 23rd Infantry Division.

159

The Thorn Birds

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The Thorn Birds

The Thorn Birds is a 1977 best-selling novel by Australian author Colleen McCullough. Set primarily on Drogheda – a fictional sheep station in the Australian Outback named after Drogheda, Ireland – the story focuses on the Cleary family and spans the years 1915 to 1969.

The Thousand Autumns Of Jacob De Zoet

The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet is a historical fiction novel by British author David Mitchell published by Sceptre in 2010. It is set during the Dutch trading concession with Japan in the late 18th-century, during the period of Japanese history known as Sakoku.

161

The Three Muskateers

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The Three Muskateers

The Three Musketeers (French: Les Trois Mousquetaires, is a French historical adventure novel written in 1844 by French author Alexandre Dumas. It is in the swashbuckler genre, which has heroic, chivalrous swordsmen who fight for justice.

162

The Tin Drum

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The Tin Drum

The Tin Drum  is a 1959 novel by Günter Grass. The novel is the first book of Grass’s Danziger Trilogie (Danzig Trilogy). It was adapted into a 1979 film, which won both the 1979 Palme d’Or and the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1980.

163

The Transit of Venus

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The Transit of Venus

A transit of Venus across the Sun takes place when the planet Venus passes directly between the Sun and a superior planet, becoming visible against the solar disk. During a transit, Venus can be seen from Earth as a small black dot moving across the face of the Sun.

164

The Tutor

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The Tutor

When Scott and Linda Gardner hire Julian Sawyer to tutor their troubled teenage son Brandon, he seems like the answer to a prayer. Capable and brilliant, Julian connects with Brandon in a way neither of his parents can.

The Twelve Rooms Of The Nile

ury’s heroine, before he had written a word of Madame Bovary, Florence Nightingale and Gustave Flaubert traveled up the Nile at the same time. In reality, they never met. But in award-winning author Enid Shomer’s The Twelve Rooms of the Nile, they ignite a friendship marked by intelligence, humor, and a ravishing tenderness that will alter both their destinies.

166

The Twentieth Wife

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The Twentieth Wife

As the daughter of starving refugees fleeing violent persecution in Persia, her fateful birth in a roadside tent sparked a miraculous reversal of family fortune, culminating in her father’s introduction to the court of Emperor Akbar. She is called Mehrunnisa, the Sun of Women. This is her story.

The Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad is a historical fiction novel by American author Colson Whitehead, published by Doubleday in 2016. The alternate history novel tells the story of Cora and Caesar, two slaves in the antebellum South during the 19th century, who make a bid for freedom from their Georgia plantation by following the Underground Railroad.

168

The Unknown Soldier

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The Unknown Soldier

The Unknown Soldier or Unknown Soldiers is a war novel by Finnish author Väinö Linna, considered his magnum opus. Published in 1954, The Unknown Soldier chronicles the Continuation War between Finland and the Soviet Union during 1941–1944 from the viewpoint of ordinary Finnish soldiers.

169

The Way We Live Now

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The Way We Live Now

The Way We Live Now is a satirical novel by Anthony Trollope, published in London in 1875 after first appearing in serialised form. It is one of the last significant Victorian novels to have been published in monthly parts.

170

The White Queen

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The White Queen

The White Queen is a 2009 historical novel by Philippa Gregory, the first of her series The Cousins’ War. It tells the story of Elizabeth Woodville, queen consort of King Edward IV of England. The 2013 BBC One television series The White Queen is a 10-part adaptation of Gregory’s novels The White Queen, The Red Queen (2010) and The Kingmaker’s Daughter (2012), and features Rebecca Ferguson as Elizabeth Woodville.

The Widows of Malabar Hill

Bombay, 1921: Perveen Mistry, the daughter of a respected Zoroastrian family, has just joined her father’s law firm, becoming one of the first female lawyers in India. Armed with a legal education from Oxford, Perveen also has a tragic personal history that makes her especially devoted to championing and protecting women’s rights

The Wine of Astonishment

The Wine of Astonishment is a 1982 novel written by Trinidadian author Earl Lovelace. The story depicts the struggles of a Spiritual Baptist community from the passing of the Prohibition Ordinance to repealing of the ban, portraying a 20-year struggle from 1932 to 1951.

173

The Winter King

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The Winter King

The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur is the first novel of the Warlord Chronicles trilogy by Bernard Cornwell, originally published in the UK in 1995 by Penguin Group. The book is based on characters and plot elements from Arthurian myth, but considerably changed and re-worked.

174

The Woman in White

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The Woman in White

The Woman in White is Wilkie Collins’s fifth published novel, written in 1859. It is a mystery novel and falls under the genre of “sensation novels”. The story is an early example of detective fiction with protagonist Walter Hartright employing many of the sleuthing techniques of later private detectives.

175

The Wreath

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The Wreath

Originally published in Norwegian in 1920 and set in fourteenth-century Norway, The Wreath chronicles the courtship of a headstrong and passionate young woman and a dangerously charming and impetuous man.

The Years Of Rice And Salt

The Years of Rice and Salt is an alternate history novel by American science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson, published in 2002. The novel explores how world history might have been different if the Black Death plague had killed 99 percent of Europe’s population, instead of a third as it did in reality.

177

The Yellow Bird Sings

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The Yellow Bird Sings

As Nazi soldiers round up the Jews in their town, Róza and her 5-year-old daughter, Shira, flee, seeking shelter in a neighbor’s barn. Hidden in the hayloft day and night, Shira struggles to stay still and quiet, as music pulses through her and the farmyard outside beckons.

They Burn the Thistles

They Burn the Thistles – Ince Memed II  is a 1969 novel by Yaşar Kemal. It was Kemal’s second novel in his İnce Memed tetralogy. The first Ince Memed novel won the Varlik prize for that year (Turkey’s highest literary prize) and earned Kemal a national reputation.

179

Things Fall Apart

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Things Fall Apart

Things Fall Apart is the debut novel by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe, first published in 1958. It depicts pre-colonial life in the southeastern part of Nigeria and the arrival of Europeans during the late 19th century. It is seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, and one of the first to receive global critical acclaim.

180

Three Day Road

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Three Day Road

Three Day Road is the first novel from Canadian writer Joseph Boyden. Joseph’s maternal grandfather, as well as an uncle on his father’s side, served as soldiers during the First World War, and Boyden draws upon a wealth of family narratives.

181

Thérèse Raquin

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Thérèse Raquin

Thérèse Raquin is an 1868 novel by French writer Émile Zola, first published in serial form in the literary magazine L’Artiste in 1867. It was Zola’s third novel, though the first to earn wide fame. The novel’s adultery and murder were considered scandalous and famously described as “putrid” in a review in the newspaper Le Figaro.

Ties That Bind, Ties That Break

Ties That Bind, Ties That Break is a young adult novel by Lensey Namioka, published in 1999. The novel tells the story of a girl who defied tradition in China in the early 1900s and later moved to the United States. It received the Washington State Book Award in 2000. A sequel, An Ocean Apart, A World Away, follows the story of Ailin’s friend, Xueyan.

183

Time and Again

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Time and Again

Time and Again is a 1970 illustrated novel by American writer Jack Finney. The many illustrations in the book are real, though, as explained in an endnote, not all are from 1882, the year in which the main action of the book takes place. A sequel, From Time to Time (1995), was published during the final year of the author’s life.

184

Time's Arrow

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Time's Arrow

Time’s Arrow: or The Nature of the Offence (1991) is a novel by Martin Amis. It was shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1991. It is notable partly because the events occur in a reverse chronology, with time passing in reverse and the main character becoming younger and younger during the novel.

A gentlewoman is fleeing an odious arranged marriage, a Scottish proctor is returning home to Avignon and a handsome young ploughman in search of adventure is on his way to volunteer with a company of archers. All come together on the road to Calais.

186

Tombland

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Tombland

Tombland is a historical mystery novel by British author C. J. Sansom. It is the seventh entry in the Matthew Shardlake Series, following 2014’s Lamentation. Set in the summer of 1549, the story deals with the investigation of a murder in Norfolk.

187

Traitor Angels

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Traitor Angels

The daughter of notorious poet John Milton, Elizabeth has never known her place in this shifting world—except by her father’s side. By day she helps transcribe his latest masterpiece, the epic poem Paradise Lost, and by night she learns languages and sword fighting.

188

Treasure Island

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Treasure Island

Treasure Island  is an adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, narrating a tale of “buccaneers and buried gold”, serialized 1881–82. Its influence is enormous on popular perceptions of pirates, making popular such elements as treasure maps marked with an “X”, schooners, the Black Spot, tropical islands, and one-legged seamen bearing parrots on their shoulders.

True History of the Kelly Gang

True History of the Kelly Gang is a novel by Australian writer Peter Carey, based loosely on the history of the Kelly Gang. It was first published in Brisbane by the University of Queensland Press in 2000. It won the 2001 Booker Prize and the Commonwealth Writers Prize in the same year.

190

U.S.A. Trilogy

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U.S.A. Trilogy

The U.S.A. trilogy is a series of three novels by American writer John Dos Passos, comprising the novels The 42nd Parallel (1930), 1919 (1932) and The Big Money (1936). The books were first published together in a volume titled U.S.A. by Modern Library in 1937.

191

Under the Volcano

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Under the Volcano

Under the Volcano is a novel by English writer Malcolm Lowry (1909–1957) published in 1947. The novel tells the story of Geoffrey Firmin, an alcoholic British consul in the small Mexican town of Quauhnahuac, on the Day of the Dead, 1 November 1938.

192

Under the Volcano

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Under the Volcano

Under the Volcano is a novel by English writer Malcolm Lowry (1909–1957) published in 1947. The novel tells the story of Geoffrey Firmin, an alcoholic British consul in the small Mexican town of Quauhnahuac, on the Day of the Dead, 1 November 1938.

193

Vile Bodies

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Vile Bodies

Vile Bodies is the second novel by Evelyn Waugh, published in 1930. It satirises the bright young things, the rich young people partying in London after World War I, and the press which fed on their doings. The original title Bright Young Things, which Waugh changed because he thought the phrase had become too clichéd, was used in Stephen Fry’s 2003 film adaptation.

Waiting for the Barbarians

Waiting for the Barbarians is a novel by the South African writer J. M. Coetzee. First published in 1980, it was chosen by Penguin for its series Great Books of the 20th Century and won both the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize for fiction.

Waiting for the Mahatma

Waiting for the Mahatma is written in Narayan’s gentle comic style. An unusual feature of this novel is the participation of Gandhi as a character. His revolutionary ideas and practices are contrasted with the views of traditionalists such as the town’s notables and Sriram’s grandmother.

196

War And Peace

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War And Peace

War and Peace  is a literary work mixed with chapters on history and philosophy by the Russian author Leo Tolstoy, first published serially, then published in its entirety in 1869. It is regarded as one of Tolstoy’s finest literary achievements and remains an internationally praised classic of world literature.

197

War and Remembrance

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War and Remembrance

War and Remembrance is a novel by Herman Wouk, published in October 1978 as the sequel to Wouk’s The Winds of War (1971). The Winds of War covers the period 1939 to 1941, and War and Remembrance continues the story of the extended Henry and Jastrow families from 15 December 1941 through 6 August 1945.

198

Washington Black

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Washington Black

Washington Black is the third novel by Canadian author Esi Edugyan. The novel was published in 2018 by HarperCollins in Canada and by Knopf Publishers internationally. A bildungsroman, the story follows the early life of George Washington “Wash” Black, chronicling his escape from slavery and his subsequent adventures.

199

Water for Elephants

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Water for Elephants

Water for Elephants is the third novel by the Canadian-American author Sara Gruen. The book was published in 2006 by Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. The historical fiction novel is a 20th century circus drama. Gruen wrote the book as part of the National Novel Writing Month.

When Christ And His Saints Slept

When Christ and His Saints Slept is a historical novel written by Sharon Kay Penman, published in 1994. It is the first of Penman’s Plantagenet trilogy, (ultimately five books) followed by Time and Chance, Devil’s Brood, Lionheart and A King’s Ransom.

Where The Crawdads Sing

Where the Crawdads Sing is a 2018 novel by American author Delia Owens. It has topped The New York Times Fiction Best Sellers of 2019 and The New York Times Fiction Best Sellers of 2020 for a combined 32 non-consecutive weeks. As of late January 2021, the book has spent 124 weeks on the best seller list.

202

White Teeth

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White Teeth

White Teeth is a 2000 novel by the British author Zadie Smith. It focuses on the later lives of two wartime friends—the Bangladeshi Samad Iqbal and the Englishman Archie Jones—and their families in London. The novel is centred around Britain’s relationship with immigrants from the British Commonwealth.

203

Wide Sargasso Sea

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Wide Sargasso Sea

Wide Sargasso Sea is a 1966 novel by Dominican-British author Jean Rhys. The novel serves as a postcolonial and feminist prequel to Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre (1847), describing the background to Mr. Rochester’s marriage from the point-of-view of his wife Antoinette Cosway, a Creole heiress.

204

Winter's Tale

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Winter's Tale

Winter’s Tale is a 1983 fantasy novel by Mark Helprin. It takes place in a mythic New York City, markedly different from reality, and in an industrial Edwardian era near the turn of the 20th century. The novel was adapted into a feature film by Akiva Goldsman.

205

Wolf By Wolf

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Wolf By Wolf

The year is 1956, and the Axis powers of the Third Reich and Imperial Japan rule. To commemorate their Great Victory, Hitler and Emperor Hirohito host the Axis Tour: an annual motorcycle race across their conjoined continents.

206

Wolf Hall

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Wolf Hall

Wolf Hall is a 2009 historical novel by English author Hilary Mantel, published by Fourth Estate, named after the Seymour family’s seat of Wolfhall, or Wulfhall, in Wiltshire. Set in the period from 1500 to 1535, Wolf Hall is a sympathetic fictionalised biography documenting the rapid rise to power of Thomas Cromwell in the court of Henry VIII through to the death of Sir Thomas More.

207

Wuthering Heights

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Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights is an 1847 novel by Emily Brontë, initially published under the pseudonym Ellis Bell. It concerns two families of the landed gentry living on the West Yorkshire moors, the Earnshaws and the Lintons, and their turbulent relationships with Earnshaw’s adopted son, Heathcliff.

208

Zorba the Greek

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Zorba the Greek

Zorba the Greek  is a novel written by the Cretan author Nikos Kazantzakis, first published in 1946. It is the tale of a young Greek intellectual who ventures to escape his bookish life with the aid of the boisterous and mysterious Alexis Zorba.

209

The Muse

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The Muse

On a hot July day in 1967, Odelle Bastien climbs the stone steps of the Skelton gallery in London, knowing that her life is about to change forever. Having struggled to find her place in the city since she arrived from Trinidad five years ago, she has been offered a job as a typist under the tutelage of the glamorous and enigmatic Marjorie Quick.

210

The Painted Girls

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The Naked Dead

1878 Paris. Following their father’s sudden death, the van Goethem sisters find their lives upended. Without his wages, and with the small amount their laundress mother earns disappearing into the absinthe bottle, eviction from their lodgings seems imminent.

The Naked and the Dead

The Naked and the Dead is a novel by Norman Mailer. Published by Rinehart & Company in 1948, when he was 25, it was his debut novel. It depicts the experiences of a platoon during World War II, based partially on Mailer’s experiences as a cook with the 112th Cavalry Regiment during the Philippines Campaign in World War II.

212

The Name Of The Rose

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The Name Of The Rose

The Name of the Rose is the 1980 debut novel by Italian author Umberto Eco. It is a historical murder mystery set in an Italian monastery in the year 1327, and an intellectual mystery combining semiotics in fiction, biblical analysis, medieval studies, and literary theory.

213

The Night Watch

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The Night Watch

The Night Watch is a dark, 2006 historical fiction novel by Sarah Waters. It was shortlisted for both the 2006 Man Booker Prize and the 2006 Orange Prize. The novel, which is told backward through third-person narrative, takes place in 1940s London during and after World War II.

214

The Night Watchman

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The Night Watchman

Thomas Wazhashk is the night watchman at the jewel bearing plant, the first factory located near the Turtle Mountain Reservation in rural North Dakota. He is also a Chippewa Council member who is trying to understand the consequences of a new “emancipation” bill on its way to the floor of the United States Congress.

215

The Nightingale

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The Nightingale

The Nightingale is a historical fiction novel by American author Kristin Hannah published by St. Martin’s Press in 2015. The book tells the story of two sisters in France during World War II and their struggle to survive and resist the German occupation of France.

The Notebook: The Proof ; The Third Lie

These three internationally acclaimed novels have confirmed Agota Kristof’s reputation as one of the most provocative exponents of new-wave European fiction. With all the stark simplicity of a fractured fairy tale, the trilogy tells the story of twin brothers, Claus and Lucas, locked in an agonizing bond that becomes a gripping allegory of the forces that have divided “brothers” in much of Europe since World War II.

The Old Curiosity Shop

The Old Curiosity Shop is one of two novels (the other being Barnaby Rudge) which Charles Dickens published along with short stories in his weekly serial Master Humphrey’s Clock, from 1840 to 1841. It was so popular that New York readers stormed the wharf when the ship bearing the final instalment arrived in 1841.

218

The Old Wives' Tale

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The Old Wives' Tale

The Old Wives’ Tale is a novel by Arnold Bennett, first published in 1908. It deals with the lives of two very different sisters, Constance and Sophia Baines, following their stories from their youth, working in their mother’s draper’s shop, into old age. It covers a period of about 70 years from roughly 1840 to 1905, and is set in Burslem and Paris.

The Once and Future King

The Once and Future King is a work by T. H. White based upon the 1485 book Le Morte d’Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory. It was first published in 1958. It collects and revises shorter novels published from 1938 to 1940, with much new material.

220

The Orenda

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The Orenda

The Orenda is a historical novel by Canadian author Joseph Boyden. It was published by Hamish Hamilton in 2013. The novel takes place in what was to become Canada in the early 17th century and is narrated by a Huron warrior named Bird, a young Iroquois girl named Snow Falls, and a French Jesuit missionary named Christophe.

The Orphan Master's Son: A Novel

The Orphan Master’s Son is a 2012 novel by American author Adam Johnson. It deals with intertwined themes of propaganda, identity, and state power in North Korea. The novel was awarded the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

222

The Other Boleyn Girl

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The Other Boleyn Girl

The Other Boleyn Girl (2001) is a historical novel written by British author Philippa Gregory, loosely based on the life of 16th-century aristocrat Mary Boleyn of whom little is known. Inspired by Mary’s life story, Gregory depicts the annulment of one of the most significant royal marriages in English history and conveys the urgency of the need for a male heir to the throne.

223

The Outsiders

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The Outsiders

The Outsiders is a coming-of-age novel by S. E. Hinton, first published in 1967 by Viking Press. Hinton was 15 when she started writing the novel but did most of the work when she was 16 and a junior in high school. Hinton was 18 when the book was published.

224

The Painted Bird

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The Painted Bird

The Painted Bird is a 1965 novel by Jerzy Kosiński that describes World War II as seen by a boy, considered a “Gypsy or Jewish stray,” wandering about small villages scattered around an unspecified country in Central and Eastern Europe.

The Phantom of the Opera

The Phantom of the Opera  is a novel by French author Gaston Leroux. It was first published as a serial in Le Gaulois from 23 September 1909 to 8 January 1910, and was released in volume form in late March 1910 by Pierre Lafitte.

226

The Piano Tuner

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The Piano Tuner

The Piano Tuner is a historical novel by Daniel Mason, set in British India and Burma. It was first published in 2002 when Mason was 26 and was his first novel. The Piano Tuner was the basis for a 2004 opera of the same name and is also due to be released as a film directed by Charlie Stratton.

227

The Pickwick Papers

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The Pickwick Papers

The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club  was Charles Dickens’ first novel. Because of his success with Sketches by Boz published in 1836 Dickens was asked by the publisher Chapman & Hall to supply descriptions to explain a series of comic “cockney sporting plates” by illustrator Robert Seymour, and to connect them into a novel.

228

The Pillars Of Earth

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The Pillars Of Earth

The Pillars of the Earth is a historical novel by Welsh author Ken Follett published in 1989 about the building of a cathedral in the fictional town of Kingsbridge, England. Set in the 12th century, the novel covers the time between the sinking of the White Ship and the murder of Thomas Becket, but focuses primarily on the Anarchy.

The Plum in the Golden Vase

The Plum in the Golden Vase or The Golden Lotus—is a Chinese novel of manners composed in vernacular Chinese during the latter half of the sixteenth century during the late Ming dynasty (1368–1644). The author took the pseudonym Lanling Xiaoxiao Sheng “The Scoffing Scholar of Lanling,” and his identity is otherwise unknown.

230

The Poisonwood Bible

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The Poisonwood Bible

The Poisonwood Bible (1998), by Barbara Kingsolver, is a best-selling novel about a missionary family, the Prices, who in 1959 move from the U.S. state of Georgia to the village of Kilanga in the Belgian Congo, close to the Kwilu River.

The Portrait of a Lady

The Portrait of a Lady is a novel by Henry James, first published as a serial in The Atlantic Monthly and Macmillan’s Magazine in 1880–81 and then as a book in 1881. It is one of James’s most popular novels and is regarded by critics as one of his finest.

The Power and the Glory

The Power and the Glory is a 1940 novel by British author Graham Greene. The title is an allusion to the doxology often recited at the end of the Lord’s Prayer: “For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, forever and ever, amen.” It was initially published in the United States under the title The Labyrinthine Ways.

233

The Power of One

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The Power of One

The Power of One is a novel by Australian author Bryce Courtenay, first published in 1989. Set in South Africa during the 1930s and 1940s, it tells the story of an English boy who, through the course of the story, acquires the name of Peekay.

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie is a novel by Muriel Spark, the best known of her works. It first saw publication in The New Yorker magazine and was published as a book by Macmillan in 1961. The character of Miss Jean Brodie brought Spark international fame and brought her into the first rank of contemporary Scottish literature.

235

The Pull Of The Stars

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The Pull Of The Stars

In an Ireland doubly ravaged by war and disease, Nurse Julia Power works at an understaffed hospital in the city center, where expectant mothers who have come down with the terrible new Flu are quarantined together.

The Queen Of The Night

Lilliet Berne is a sensation of the Paris Opera, a legendary soprano with every accolade except an original role, every singer’s chance at immortality. When one is finally offered to her, she realizes with alarm that the libretto is based on a hidden piece of her past.

237

The Quincunx

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The Quincunx

The Quincunx (The Inheritance of John Huffam) is the epic first novel of Charles Palliser. It takes the form of a Dickensian mystery set in early 19th century England, but Palliser has added the modern attributes of an ambiguous plot and unreliable narrators.

238

The Razor's Edge

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The Razor's Edge

The Razor’s Edge is a 1944 novel by W. Somerset Maugham. It tells the story of Larry Darrell, an American pilot traumatized by his experiences in World War I, who sets off in search of some transcendent meaning in his life. The story begins through the eyes of Larry’s friends and acquaintances as they witness his personality change after the war.

The Real Life of Alejandro Mayta

The Real Life of Alejandro Mayta is an astute psychological portrait of a modern revolutionary and a searching account of an old friend’s struggle to understand him. First published in English in 1986, the novel probes the long and checkered history of radical politics in Latin America.

The Real Story of Ah-Q

The True Story of Ah Q is an episodic novella written by Lu Xun, first published as a serial between December 4, 1921 and February 12, 1922. It was later placed in his first short story collection Call to Arms  in 1923 and is the longest story in the collection.

The Red Badge of Courage

The Red Badge of Courage is a war novel by American author Stephen Crane (1871–1900). Taking place during the American Civil War, the story is about a young private of the Union Army, Henry Fleming, who flees from the field of battle.

242

The Red Queen

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The Red Queen

Red Queen is a young adult fantasy novel written by American writer Victoria Aveyard. Published in February 2015, it was her first novel and first series. Aveyard followed up with three sequels: Glass Sword, King’s Cage and War Storm.

243

The Red and the Black

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The Red and the Black

The Red and the Black is a historical psychological novel in two volumes by Stendhal, published in 1830. It chronicles the attempts of a provincial young man to rise socially beyond his modest upbringing through a combination of talent, hard work, deception, and hypocrisy.

The Remains Of The Day

The Remains of the Day is a 1989 novel by the Nobel Prize-winning British author Kazuo Ishiguro. The protagonist, Stevens, is a butler with a long record of service at Darlington Hall, a stately home near Oxford, England. In 1956, he takes a road trip to visit a former colleague, and reminisces about events at Darlington Hall in the 1920s and 1930s.

The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui

The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui  subtitled “A parable play”, is a 1941 play by the German playwright Bertolt Brecht. It chronicles the rise of Arturo Ui, a fictional 1930s Chicago mobster, and his attempts to control the cauliflower racket by ruthlessly disposing of the opposition.

The Return of the Native

The Return of the Native is Thomas Hardy’s sixth published novel. It first appeared in the magazine Belgravia, a publication known for its sensationalism, and was presented in twelve monthly installments from January to December 1878.

The Return of the Native

The Return of the Native is Thomas Hardy’s sixth published novel. It first appeared in the magazine Belgravia, a publication known for its sensationalism, and was presented in twelve monthly installments from January to December 1878.

The Samurai’s Garden

The Samurai’s Garden is a 1994 novel by American author Gail Tsukiyama. Many consider it to be Tsukiyama’s finest work, and an influential piece in Asian-American literature. The Samurai’s Garden is often included in required reading lists for high school students, and is considered to be a prime example of using effective figurative language.

249

The Scarlet Letter

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The Scarlet Letter

The Scarlet Letter: A Romance is a work of historical fiction by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, published in 1850. Set in Puritan Massachusetts Bay Colony during the years 1642 to 1649, the novel tells the story of Hester Prynne, who conceives a daughter through an affair and then struggles to create a new life of repentance and dignity.

250

The Shell Seekers

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The Shell Seekers

The Shell Seekers is a 1987 novel by Rosamunde Pilcher. It became one of her most famous best-sellers. It was nominated by the British public in 2003 as one of the top 100 novels in the BBC’s Big Read. In Germany the novel is called Die Muschelsucher and was also in the top 100 novels.

251

The Sheltering Sky

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The Sheltering Sky

The Sheltering Sky is a 1949 novel of alienation and existential despair by American writer and composer Paul Bowles. The story centers on Port Moresby and his wife Kit, a married couple originally from New York who travel to the North African desert accompanied by their friend Tunner.

The Siege of Krishnapur

The Siege of Krishnapur is a novel by J. G. Farrell, first published in 1973. Inspired by events such as the sieges of Cawnapore (Kanpur) and Lucknow, the book details the siege of a fictional Indian town, Krishnapur, during the Indian Rebellion of 1857 from the perspective of the British residents.

The Signature Of All Things

The Signature of All Things is a novel by Elizabeth Gilbert. It was originally published in 2013 and longlisted for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction. The story follows Alma Whittaker, daughter of a botanical explorer, as she comes into her own within the world of plants and science.

The Silence Of The Girls

The Silence of the Girls is a 2018 novel by English novelist Pat Barker. It recounts the events of the Iliad, chiefly from the point of view of Briseis. The plot begins when Greeks led Achilles sack Lyrnessus, describing the looting and burning of the city, the massacre of its men and the abduction of its women including Briseis, the childless wife of its king Mynes.

255

The Sisters Brothers

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The Sisters Brothers

The Sisters Brothers is a 2011 Western novel by Canadian-born author Patrick deWitt. The darkly comic story takes place in Oregon and California in 1851. The narrator, Eli Sisters, and his brother Charlie are assassins tasked with killing Hermann Kermit Warm, an ingenious prospector who has been accused of stealing from the Sisters’ fearsome boss, the Commodore.

The Slaves of Solitude

The Slaves of Solitude is a novel by Patrick Hamilton. It was published in 1947 and reissued by New York Review Books Classics in 2007. In the United States it was originally published under the title Riverside.

257

The Song of Hiawatha

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The Song of Hiawatha

The Song of Hiawatha is an 1855 epic poem in trochaic tetrameter by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow which features Native American characters. The epic relates the fictional adventures of an Ojibwe warrior named Hiawatha and the tragedy of his love for Minnehaha, a Dakota woman.

258

The Song of Roland

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The Song of Roland

The Song of Roland  is an 11th-century epic poem  based on Roland and the Battle of Roncevaux Pass in 778, during the reign of Charlemagne. It is the oldest surviving major work of French literature and exists in various manuscript versions, which testify to its enormous and enduring popularity from the 12th to 16th centuries.

259

The Sot-Weed Factor

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The Sot-Weed Factor

The Sot-Weed Factor is a 1960 novel by the American writer John Barth. The novel marks the beginning of Barth’s literary postmodernism. The Sot-Weed Factor takes its title from the poem The Sot-Weed Factor: Or, a Voyage to Maryland. A Satyr (1708) by the English-born poet Ebenezer Cooke (c. 1665 – c. 1732), about whom few biographical details are known.

The Most Precious Of Cargoes

Once upon a time in an enormous forest lived a woodcutter and his wife. The woodcutter is very poor and a war rages around them, making it difficult for them to put food on the table. Yet every night, his wife prays for a child.

261

The Lamplighters

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The Lamplighters

The Lamplighters is a heart-stopping mystery rich with the salty air of the Cornish coast, and an unforgettable story of love and grief that explores the way our fears blur the line between the real and the imagined.

The Land Beyond The Sea

The Kingdom of Jerusalem, also known as Outremer, is the land far beyond the sea. Baptized in blood when the men of the First Crusade captured Jerusalem from the Saracens in 1099, the kingdom defined an utterly new world, a place where enemies were neighbors and neighbors became enemies.

263

The Last Of The Wine

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The Last Of The Wine

The Last of the Wine is Mary Renault’s first novel set in ancient Greece, the setting that would become her most important arena. The novel was published in 1956 and is the second of her works to feature male homosexuality as a major theme. It was a bestseller within the gay community.

The Light Between Oceans

The Light Between Oceans is a 2012 Australian historical fiction novel by M. L. Stedman, her debut novel, published by Random House Australia on 20 March 2012. A film adaptation of the same name starring Alicia Vikander and Michael Fassbender was released on 2 September 2016.

265

The Little Stranger

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The Little Stranger

The Little Stranger is a 2009 gothic novel written by Sarah Waters. It is a ghost story set in a dilapidated mansion in Warwickshire, England in the 1940s. Departing from her earlier themes of lesbian and gay fiction, Waters’ fifth novel features a male narrator, a country doctor who makes friends with an old gentry family of declining fortunes who own a very old estate that is crumbling around them.

266

The Long Ships

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The Long Ships

The Long Ships or Red Orm  is an adventure novel by the Swedish writer Frans G. Bengtsson. The narrative is set in the late 10th century and follows the adventures of the Viking Röde Orm – called “Red” for his hair and his temper, a native of Scania.

267

The Long Song

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The Long Song

The Long Song is a historical novel by Andrea Levy published in 2010 that was the recipient of the Walter Scott Prize. It was Levy’s fifth and final novel, following the 2004 publication of Small Island. In December 2018, a three-part television adaptation of the same name was broadcast on BBC One; The Long Song was aired on PBS in February 2021.

268

The Lost Steps

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The Lost Steps

The Lost Steps describes a composer, fleeing an empty existence in New York City, takes a journey with his mistress to one of the few remaining areas of the world not yet touched by civilization-the upper reaches of a great South American river.

269

The Luminaries

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The Luminaries

The Luminaries is a 2013 novel by Eleanor Catton. Set in New Zealand’s South Island in 1866, the novel follows Walter Moody, a prospector who travels to the West Coast settlement of Hokitika to make his fortune on the goldfields.

270

The Lusiad

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The Lusiad

The Lusiads, is a Portuguese epic poem written by Luís Vaz de Camões and first published in 1572. It is widely regarded as the most important work of Portuguese literature and is frequently compared to Virgil’s Aeneid (1st c. BC). The work celebrates the discovery of a sea route to India by the Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama (1469–1524).

271

The Makioka Sisters

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The Makioka Sisters

The Makioka Sisters  is a novel by Japanese writer Jun’ichirō Tanizaki that was serialized from 1943 to 1948. It follows the lives of the wealthy Makioka family of Osaka from the autumn of 1936 to April 1941, focusing on the family’s attempts to find a husband for the third sister, Yukiko.

The Man In The High Castle

The Man in the High Castle is an alternate history novel by American writer Philip K. Dick. Published and set in 1962, the novel takes place fifteen years after a different end to World War II, and depicts intrigues between the victorious Axis Powers—primarily, Imperial Japan and Nazi Germany—as they rule over the Southern and Western United States.

The Manuscript Found in Saragossa

The Manuscript Found in Saragossa  is a frame-tale novel written in French at the turn of 18th and 19th centuries by the Polish author Count Jan Potocki (1761–1815).

The Marriage Of Cadmus And Harmony

Presenting the stories of Zeus and Europa, Theseus and Ariadne, the birth of Athens and the fall of Troy, in all their variants, Calasso also uncovers the distant origins of secrets and tragedy, virginity, and rape. “A perfect work like no other. (Calasso) has re-created . . . the morning of our world.”–Gore Vidal.

The Marriage of Opposites

The Dovekeepers and The Museum of Extraordinary Things: a forbidden love story set on the tropical island of St. Thomas about the extraordinary woman who gave birth to painter Camille Pissarro; the Father of Impressionism.

The Master and Margarita

The Master and Margarita  is a novel by Russian writer Mikhail Bulgakov, written in the Soviet Union between 1928 and 1940 during Stalin’s regime. A censored version was published in Moscow magazine in 1966–1967, after the writer’s death.

The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood

The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood of Great Renown in Nottinghamshire is an 1883 novel by the American illustrator and writer Howard Pyle. Consisting of a series of episodes in the story of the English outlaw Robin Hood and his band of Merry Men.

278

The Mill on the Floss

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The Mill on the Floss

The Mill on the Floss is a novel by Mary Ann Evans (George Eliot), first published in three volumes in 1860 by William Blackwood. The first American edition was published by Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New York.

279

The Mists Of Avalon

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The Mists Of Avalon

The Mists of Avalon is a 1983 historical fantasy novel by American writer Marion Zimmer Bradley, in which the author relates the Arthurian legends from the perspective of the female characters.

280

The Moonstone

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The Moonstone

The Moonstone (1868) by Wilkie Collins is a 19th-century British epistolary novel. It is an early example of the modern detective novel, and established many of the ground rules of the modern genre. The story was serialised in Charles Dickens’s magazine All the Year Round.

281

The Moor's Last Sigh

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The Moor's Last Sigh

The Moor’s Last Sigh traces four generations of the narrator’s family and the ultimate effects upon the narrator. The narrator, Moraes Zogoiby, traces his family’s beginnings down through time to his own lifetime. Moraes, who is called “Moor” throughout the book, is an exceptional character, whose physical body ages twice as fast as a normal person’s does and also has a deformed hand.

282

The Moor’s Account

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The Moor’s Account

The Moor’s Account is a fictional memoir of Estebanico, the Moroccan slave who survived the Narvaez expedition and accompanied Cabeza de Vaca. He is widely considered to be the first black explorer of America, but little is known about his early life except for one line in Cabeza de Vaca’s chronicle: “The fourth [survivor] is Estebanico, an Arab Negro from Azamor.”

283

The City Of Tears

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The City Of Tears

The City of Tears is the second thrilling historical epic in The Burning Chambers series, for fans of Ken Follett and Dan Brown. August 1572: Minou Joubert and her family are in Paris for a Royal Wedding, an alliance between the Catholic Crown and the Huguenot King of Navarre intended to bring peace to France after a decade of religious wars.

The Cloister and the Hearth

The Cloister and the Hearth (1861) is a historical novel by the English author Charles Reade. Set in the 15th century, it relates the travels of a young scribe and illuminator, Gerard Eliassoen, through several European countries. The Cloister and the Hearth often describes the events, people and their practices in minute detail.

The Code of the Woosters

The Code of the Woosters is a novel by P. G. Wodehouse, first published on 7 October 1938, in the United Kingdom by Herbert Jenkins, London, and in the United States by Doubleday, Doran, New York. It was serialised in The Saturday Evening Post (US) from 16 July to 3 September 1938 and in the London Daily Mail from 14 September to 6 October 1938.

The Colony Of Unrequited Dreams

The Colony of Unrequited Dreams is a novel by Wayne Johnston, published on September 30, 1998 by Knopf Canada. Johnston’s breakthrough work, the novel was a Canadian bestseller, and was shortlisted for the 1998 Giller Prize and the 1998 Governor General’s Award for English fiction.

The Confessions of Nat Turner

The Confessions of Nat Turner is a 1967 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by American writer William Styron. Presented as a first-person narrative by historical figure Nat Turner, the novel concerns the slave revolt in Virginia in 1831.

288

The Crucible

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The Crucible

The Crucible is a 1953 play by American playwright Arthur Miller. It is a dramatized and partially fictionalized story of the Salem witch trials that took place in the Massachusetts Bay Colony during 1692–93. Miller wrote the play as an allegory for McCarthyism, when the United States government persecuted people accused of being communists.

The Custom of the Country

The Custom of the Country is a 1913 tragicomedy of manners novel by American Edith Wharton. It tells the story of Undine Spragg, a Midwestern girl who attempts to ascend in New York City society.

290

The Czar's Madman

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The Czar's Madman

The Czar’s Madman  is a 1978 novel by Estonian writer Jaan Kross. This historical novel is about a Livonian nobleman, Timotheus Eberhard von Bock etc. who has married a peasant girl named Eeva to prove everyone that good men are equal before nature, God and ideals.

291

The Day of the Locust

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The Day of the Locust

The Day of the Locust is a 1939 novel by American author Nathanael West set in Hollywood, California. The novel follows a young artist from the Yale School of Fine Arts named Tod Hackett, who has been hired by a Hollywood studio to do scene design and painting.

292

The Days of His Grace

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The Days of His Grace

The Days of His Grace  is a 1960 novel by Swedish writer Eyvind Johnson. Set mostly in northern Italy, close to Aquileia, it tells the story of the fate of a Langobard family as their homeland falls under the domination of Charlemagne.

The Death of the Heart

The Death of the Heart is a 1938 novel by Elizabeth Bowen set in the interwar period. It is about a sixteen-year-old orphan, Portia Quayne, who moves to London to live with her half-brother Thomas and falls in love with Eddie, a friend of her sister-in-law.

The Devil's Arithmetic

The Devil’s Arithmetic is a historical fiction time slip novel written by American author Jane Yolen and published in 1988. The book is about Hannah Stern, a Jewish girl who lives in New Rochelle, New York and is sent back in time to experience the Holocaust.

295

The Diary of a Nobody

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The Diary of a Nobody

The Diary of a Nobody is an English comic novel written by the brothers George and Weedon Grossmith, with illustrations by the latter. It originated as an intermittent serial in Punch magazine in 1888–89 and first appeared in book form, with extended text and added illustrations, in 1892.

296

The Dig

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The Dig

The Dig is a historical novel by John Preston, published in May 2007, set in the context of the 1939 Anglo-Saxon ship burial excavation at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, England. The dust jacket describes it as “a brilliantly realized account of the most famous archaeological dig in Britain in modern times”.

297

The Doll Factory

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The Doll Factory

The Doll Factory, the debut novel by Elizabeth Macneal, is an intoxicating story of art, obsession and possession. London. 1850. The Great Exhibition is being erected in Hyde Park and among the crowd watching the spectacle two people meet.

298

The Dovekeepers

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The Dovekeepers

The Dovekeepers is a 2011 historical novel by American writer Alice Hoffman. The novel dramatizes the Siege of Masada (73–74 CE) by troops of the Roman Empire towards the end of the First Jewish–Roman War (66–73 CE).

299

The Eagle Has Landed

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The Eagle Has Landed

The Eagle Has Landed is a book by British writer Jack Higgins, set during World War II and first published in 1975. It was quickly adapted into a British film of the same name, directed by John Sturges and released in 1976. It starred Michael Caine, Donald Sutherland, Jenny Agutter, and Robert Duvall.

The Education of Little Tree

The Education of Little Tree is a memoir-style novel written by Asa Earl Carter under the pseudonym Forrest Carter. First published in 1976 by Delacorte Press, it was initially promoted as an authentic autobiography recounting Forrest Carter’s youth experiences with his Cherokee grandparents in the Appalachian mountains.

The Electric Michelangelo

The Electric Michelangelo is a book written in 2004 by Sarah Hall. The main character, Cy Parks, is a tattoo artist and the book follows his life and dreams. It was longlisted for the Orange prize. The book was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2004.

302

The Emigrants

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The Emigrants

The Emigrants  is a 1992 collection of narratives by the German writer W. G. Sebald. It won the Berlin Literature Prize, the Literatur Nord Prize, and the Johannes Bobrowski Medal. The English translation by Michael Hulse was first published in 1996.

The General of the Dead Army

The General of the Dead Army is a 1963 novel by the Albanian writer Ismail Kadare. It is the author’s most critically acclaimed novel. Kadare was encouraged to write the book by Drago Siliqi, literary critic and director of the state-owned publishing house Naim Frashëri.

304

The Ghost Road

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The Ghost Road

The Ghost Road is a war novel by Pat Barker, first published in 1995 and winner of the Booker Prize. It is the third volume of a trilogy that follows the fortunes of shell-shocked British army officers towards the end of the First World War. The other books in the trilogy are Regeneration and The Eye in the Door.

305

The Go-Between

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The Go-Between

The Go-Between is a novel by L. P. Hartley published in 1953. His best-known work, it has been adapted several times for stage and screen. The book gives a critical view of society at the end of the Victorian era through the eyes of a naïve schoolboy outsider.

The God Of Small Things

The God of Small Things is the debut novel of Indian writer Arundhati Roy. It is a story about the childhood experiences of fraternal twins whose lives are destroyed by the “Love Laws” that lay down “who should be loved, and how. And how much.”

307

The Godfather

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The Godfather

The Godfather is a crime novel by American author Mario Puzo. Originally published in 1969 by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, the novel details the story of a fictional Mafia family in New York City (and Long Beach, New York), headed by Vito Corleone. Puzo’s dedication for The Godfather is “For Anthony Cleri”.

308

The Gods Of Tango

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The Gods Of Tango

February 1913: seventeen-year-old Leda, carrying only a small trunk and her father’s cherished violin, leaves her Italian village for a new home, and a new husband, in Argentina. Arriving in Buenos Aires, she discovers that he has been killed, but she remains: living in a tenement, without friends or family, on the brink of destitution.

309

The Golden Bowl

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The Golden Bowl

The Golden Bowl is a 1904 novel by Henry James. Set in England, this complex, intense study of marriage and adultery completes what some critics have called the “major phase” of James’s career. The Golden Bowl explores the tangle of interrelationships between a father and daughter and their respective spouses.

The Golem And The Jinni

The Golem and the Jinni  is a debut novel written by Helene Wecker, published by Harper in April 2013. It combines the genre of historical fiction with elements of fantasy, telling the story of two displaced magical creatures in 19th century New York City.